AHAT Alert – An Ascot Nest Found & Destroyed

Following the National Bee Unit confirming on 8th October a sighting of an Asian hornet in the Ascot area of Berkshire … it was reported during the evening of 12th Oct. that a nest has been found and destroyed and that searches continue for any other hornets in the area.

Good news, but remain vigilant for local sightings.

The original message about the sighting from the NBU …
Dear Beekeeper, The National Bee Unit has confirmed a sighting of an Asian hornet in the Ascot area of Berkshire, after it was reported by a member of the public and has initiated a contingency response. What Can I Do? Familiarise yourself with the Asian Hornet:Monitor your apiaries using monitoring traps:
Information on the Asian hornet pages of BeeBase at http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?sectionid=117Ensure your BeeBase records are up to date with apiary locations and contact information. Log in at https://www.nationalbeeunit.com/login.cfm to check your details Report any suspect sightings with your smart phone or tablet, by using the ‘Asian hornet Watch’ app: for Android and iOS devices.online at: http://www.brc.ac.uk/risc/alert.php?species=asian_hornetby email to: alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk. Please include as much information as possible in your email; where you saw the sighting, your name and contact details and if possible an image. Please note that during outbreaks the NBU receive high numbers of calls and emails. Therefore, we ask that you use the information given above to report sightings. Where possible please use the app or electronic form. We thank you in advance for your co-operation and continued vigilance. To unsubscribe to these updates, please log in https://www.nationalbeeunit.com/login.cfm and update your preferences.

Jim Wynn, RBKA’s AHAT Leader, and Surrey BKA’s AHAT Coordinator comments …

“And just when I thought we had got away with it for another year ! …

Asian Hornet identified in Ascot

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/asian-hornet-identified-in-ascot

Please pass this message round, be vigilant and pay attention to correct identification.

https://www.bbka.org.uk/faqs/identifying-asian-hornet

… but I wish we could change the name to yellow legged hornet to save some of the false sightings.”

This is the story so far

  Mainland UKConfirmed sightingsNests destroyed
201631
201711
201894
201953
2020 11
So far 20211

Jim

If you haven’t downloaded the Asian Hornet Watch app yet – then please do. 

Jim Wynn


COMMUNICATION

REMEMBER if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

AHAT Alert – 8th October 2021

The National Bee Unit has confirmed a sighting of an Asian hornet in the Ascot area of Berkshire, after it was reported by a member of the public and has initiated a contingency response.

This from the NBU …
Dear Beekeeper, The National Bee Unit has confirmed a sighting of an Asian hornet in the Ascot area of Berkshire, after it was reported by a member of the public and has initiated a contingency response. What Can I Do? Familiarise yourself with the Asian Hornet:Monitor your apiaries using monitoring traps:
Information on the Asian hornet pages of BeeBase at http://www.nationalbeeunit.com/index.cfm?sectionid=117Ensure your BeeBase records are up to date with apiary locations and contact information. Log in at https://www.nationalbeeunit.com/login.cfm to check your details Report any suspect sightings with your smart phone or tablet, by using the ‘Asian hornet Watch’ app: for Android and iOS devices.online at: http://www.brc.ac.uk/risc/alert.php?species=asian_hornetby email to: alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk. Please include as much information as possible in your email; where you saw the sighting, your name and contact details and if possible an image. Please note that during outbreaks the NBU receive high numbers of calls and emails. Therefore, we ask that you use the information given above to report sightings. Where possible please use the app or electronic form. We thank you in advance for your co-operation and continued vigilance. To unsubscribe to these updates, please log in https://www.nationalbeeunit.com/login.cfm and update your preferences.

Jim Wynn, RBKA’s AHAT Leader, and Surrey BKA’s AHAT Coordinator comments …

“And just when I thought we had got away with it for another year ! …

Asian Hornet identified in Ascot

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/asian-hornet-identified-in-ascot

Please pass this message round, be vigilant and pay attention to correct identification.

https://www.bbka.org.uk/faqs/identifying-asian-hornet

… but I wish we could change the name to yellow legged hornet to save some of the false sightings.”

This is the story so far

  Mainland UKConfirmed sightingsNests destroyed
201631
201711
201894
201953
2020 11
So far 20211

Jim

If you haven’t downloaded the Asian Hornet Watch app yet – then please do. 

Jim Wynn


COMMUNICATION

REMEMBER if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

AHAT Update – October/November 2020

Jonathan Brookhouse has announced his stepping down as Surrey AHAT Co-ordinator in order to take up the Chairmanship of Guildford Division.

Our own Jim Wynn has been invited by Jonathan and has agreed, to take over the role.

Jonathan writes…

“I would like to say that it has been a very interesting few years getting things moving and thankfully so far, we have not had to be really tested. I’m certain that we would rise to the challenge and support the NBU if we ever need to.

Jim will need to update the list of contacts and due to data protection, he will need your permission to have the names and contacts of your AH team members, at the least how many you have so that he can co-ordinate effectively if the need arises in the coming seasons.

I have attached last month’s Guildford AH update, in order to reiterate the need to not become complacent even if this year has been extremely quiet. In the example of Jersey where numbers have also fallen, in northern France, the numbers have actually gone up and Jersey are anticipating a possible surge next year. Many thanks and best wishes.”  

Asian Hornet update October 2020

Another very quiet month on the Asian Hornet front. There has still only been one confirmed sighting and the associated nest destroyed in the country this year. It was in Gosport, as reported in last months (September) newsletter.

If hornets are around, this is the time of year when they could be spotted feeding on Ivy flowers and fallen rotting fruit such as apples.

Interestingly, the numbers of sightings in Jersey has also been relatively quiet this year so far.

According to the Jersey Evening Post, 24 October ‘ – it seems that Jersey’s Asian Hornet population has suffered a dramatic – and unexplained – decline during 2020. Only 38 nests have been found since the spring – compared to 77 by this time last year and 55 during the whole of 2018. No nests have been discovered this month, compared to 12 in October 2019, with the last colony being found on 26 September. The number of queens found has also dropped with 42 being caught this year compared to 69 this time last year’

The article goes on to point to a few possible reasons for this decline; one being the restricted traffic from the continent due to the Covid pandemic. Newly emerging queens can hitch a lift on boats and freight. Alastair Christie, Jersey’s AH coordinator suggests other probable reasons are “the damp and variable temperatures between January and March this year. We believe that the hibernating queens are susceptible to fungal disease caused by wetter, warmer conditions.” He goes on to say that “- there is no evidence that the public are missing them, traps and public reporting are not producing evidence of hornets out there. There is also the constant pressure of the controlling activities of the Department of the Environment and the Asian hornet volunteers on the hornets”

This is great news for Jersey. It looks like their great efforts are paying off with some help from the weather combined with less movement of people and goods.

However, the article goes on to say that Alistair Christie warns that despite the lower numbers in Jersey, the hornet populations in nearby parts of France have actually increased this year. As a result, there is likely to be a reinvasion of hornets from the French coast in the spring.

Jonathan Brookhouse.

 

If you haven’t downloaded the Asian Hornet Watch app yet – then please do.

 

Sept. and Oct. – were the main months for sightings.

  Confirmed sightings Nests destroyed
   2016   3 1
   2017 1 1
   2018 9 4
   2019 5 3
   2020    1 1

Jim Wynn


COMMUNICATION

REMEMBER if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

AHAT Update – September 2020

The beginning of this month produced the first Asian Hornet to be found this year.

It was spotted in Gosport by a member of the public in his conservatory, it was then identified by a local beekeeper and confirmed by the lab on Tuesday 8th Sept.

The small, football sized nest was found by the NBU on Thursday and it was destroyed on Friday 11th. Although it took a small team of inspectors to track it down (they were using Suterra bait to monitor flight directions and visit frequencies). We can safely say that from start to finish, the successful outcome was pretty fast and a great example of how the system works. Well done NBU and all concerned!

This is also a sharp reminder for us all to stay vigilant and wherever we can, inform the public about this threat so that there are more eyes open.

There is a good article in this months Bee Craft on page 9

  • Work in France estimates the nest destruction and control between 2006 and 2015 cost some €23million.
  • The article tells the story of an English couple who moved to France and their experiences with Asian Hornets and it is worth a couple of minutes watching a video of their home made trap at tinyurl.com/BC2020-10-10.
  • In Jersey 37 nests had been found by September 4th (54 last year)

If you haven’t downloaded the Asian Hornet Watch app yet – then please do so.

Sept. and Oct. – are the main months for sightings.

Confirmed sightingsNests destroyed
201631
201711
201894
201953
2020 so far …11

Jim Wynn


COMMUNICATION

REMEMBER if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

AHAT Update – August 2020

Would YOU be able to recognise a Hornet or a Nest as being of the Yellow Legged Hornet variety?

In this August 2020 update;

Our Surrey AHAT Coordinator Jonathan Brookhouse tells of a found nest not being quite what was feared upon first sight;

And our AHAT Leader, Jim Wynn, reminds us all of the need to become confident in correctly identifying YLH’s and the importance of capturing sightings on camera.

First, this from Jonathan Brookhouse …

Again, another quiet month nation-wide, and no confirmed sightings of Asian Hornet in the UK so far (25 August). I’m musing that that the reason for this is that the Covid lockdown has reduced the movement of people and perhaps also goods across borders so much that there is little opportunity to be inadvertently brought over.  Less traffic, less opportunity.

The other possibility is that Covid has stopped people being out and about so that sightings are fewer and somewhere, without our knowing, AH is living happily undisturbed.

I think it is the former as I heard that there have actually been more reported sightings from the public than this time last year.

However, we need to stay vigilant, as we are coming up to the season when they really begin to multiply if there are any about.

An interesting exercise follows; at the beginning of August, a vigilant member of public sent this image of a nest in her garden to one of our members Barrie Lloyd, as she knew he was a beekeeper and may be able to identify it. Barrie passed it on to me, it was late in the afternoon and the light was fading.

What do you think this is?

The garden where this was taken is in Highcliff, a few short miles away from Christchurch where two related nests were destroyed in early October 2019.

Now, what do you think this is?

As I looked at the image, I thought the same… big nest in a tree…classic…it’s got to be…

However, we asked for a clearer image which was kindly taken about an hour later by the daughter of the garden owner on her phone that had a better camera, and this image was sent through…

NOW, what do you think it is?

I was now ready to grab my net and specimen jar, jump into my trusted Honda, call out the cavalry and lead the charge with guns blazing!! But…

Look closer…blow up the image and look underneath, attached to the nest…

My conviction began to fade and as I passed it on to the local AHAT lead to investigate, asking if it could be investigated as soon as possible pointing out the underneath and mentioned that the image doesn’t give a proper perspective of size. The outcome was that an AH team member went around the following day and she found that is was a wasp nest. They actually found two and arranged for them to be destroyed as there was an elderly neighbour next door which was a concern.

I hope you enjoyed that story and I hope it’s all the excitement we have this year regarding Asian Hornets … Stay vigilant!

Jonathan Brookhouse.

And now this from Jim Wynn …

Do please bear in mind that as Beekeepers, we have a very important public role as ‘Verifiers of Reports of Yellow Legged Hornet sightings’.

As our guest speaker, Lynne Ingram, mentioned earlier this month, some 8000 reports of sightings received by the Asian Hornet Watch Team are unable to be classified either as ‘definitely could be’ or ‘certainly are not’ YLH’s due to the vagueness of descriptions or clarity of captured images. As a rule, beyond acknowledging such reports, few of them may ever be actively followed up.

So, even if you remain unsure yourself after comparing with notices, posters or on-line references, do try to include with your report to the Asian Hornet Watch team good quality (decent resolution) photos of what you have seen or are describing. This will help the team to either positively discount or actively pursue your report.

Jim Wynn


COMMUNICATION

REMEMBER if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

AHAT Info – BBC Film Report

“UK beekeepers on

lookout for bee-eater?”

Filmed, edited and produced by Tony Smith, with additional camera work by Robert Hall, the 2.28 min video was published by the BBC on 3rd June 2020.   

‘Spotted’ by Mike Hill and remarked by our AHAT Leader Jim Wynn as being  “A good video” … well worth a watch. 

Click on image or link below to go to source BBC website content.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/science-environment-52896891/asian-hornet-uk-beekeepers-on-lookout-for-bee-eater


COMMUNICATION

To repeat, if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

AHAT Update – May 2020

Is the Yellow Legged Hornet arriving?

In this May 2020 update, our Reigate AHAT Leader Jim Wynn poses the question. 

I had hoped the lack of people movement would cut down the number of YLH arriving in the country as a number in the past do seem to have been hitch hikers.

The problem at the moment is that it is almost impossible to tell the difference between a starter wasp nest and a starter YLH nest.

So the advice is …

If you suspect a nest to be YLH,  leave it be and observe.

If the nest has already fallen of, due to wind say, and you think it is a YLH nest then close it over with soft tissue paper, so the contents do not fall out in transit, wrap it all in cotton wool, put it in a small box with extra padding to prevent it from moving at all in the box and send it to the NBU lab. for testing.

Please send it for the attention of Kirsty Stainton at the NBU Laboratory, room 02G06, National Agri-Food Innovation Centre, Sand Hutton. York, YO41 1LZ. With a cover note in the box explaining what is inside, where it was found and could it please be verified.

Please let me know about any action you have taken and I will inform the Surrey AHAT coordinator.

The situation isn’t helped at the moment with stories about the Giant Asian Hornet appearing on social media, so confusion will follow.  If you haven’t looked at how to tell and explain the difference between wasps, European hornet and the yellow legged hornet, please re familiarise yourself. And make sure you have the Asian Hornet App on your phone.

Thanks for your vigilance

Jim


STARTER NESTS

Below are some examples of starter nests. They are from France, from Jersey, and from West Sussex. Not all are made by Asian Hornets. Can you identify which is which?
Reporting a sighting stays the same, by the methods that you already know about. (See below photos.)

COMMUNICATION

To repeat, if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

AHAT Update – March 2020

Asian (Yellow Legged) Hornet, March 2020 update from the Surrey AHAT Coordinator, Jonathan Brookhouse… 


… issued by our AHAT leader, Jim Wynn


STAY VIGILANT

Any queens that may have manged to overwinter in the UK will be coming out of hibernation this month and next if the weather stays warm. Just as we now see Bumblebee queens searching for nesting sites, the same will be for hornets. Staying at home with time on our hands gives us the extra opportunity to do a thorough search of sheds and outbuildings for starter nests.
Hopefully, we will see a drop in confirmed sightings this year as there will be less travel of goods and visitors and virtually no tourists coming over from abroad, where hornets could hitch a ride.

As mentioned in the previous update, there is an Asian Hornet questionnaire on the new www.ahat.org.uk website set up by the Devon teams.
They designed the online quiz to help beekeepers and members of the public become aware of the Asian hornet threat. The questions are a series of multiple choices to test your knowledge in identifying the Asian hornet as well as seeing if you know its habits and how you would go about reporting a sighting.
It is recommended that everyone takes the time to do a bit of research and take the online self-test. Take the quiz – good luck!

STARTER NESTS

Below are some examples of starter nests. They are from France, from Jersey, and from West Sussex. Not all are made by Asian Hornets. Can you identify which is which?
Reporting a sighting stays the same, by the methods that you already know about. (See below photos.)

The NBU is still functioning as per their recent statement that you all should have received.
Stay safe.

Jonathan Brookhouse Surrey Regional AHAT Coordinator.

Communication

To repeat, if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

AHAT AGM Report – Nov 2019

AHAT AGM Report


Jim Wynn, November 2019


IDENTIFICATION AND NAMING

There is no doubt that the general public are very interested and concerned about the Asian Hornet problem.

RBKA members have shown a keen interest in learning about the hornet and we have had two successful AH sessions and an AH stand at our recent honey show.

Anecdotally, however, there is confusion in the public and amongst some beekeepers about how to identify the insect.

So, we urge all members to familiarise themselves with its characteristics and be confident about your ability to identify the Asian Horne (Vespa velutina nigrithorax).

Crucially, we need all members to be able to describe the characteristics to the general public in simple non-scientific terms.

In an effort to draw out the main differences with our native European Hornet we would like members to start to use the alternate name Yellow Legged Hornet (YLH), as it is known in Asia.

The three main differences for easy identification are:

                                                 Yellow Legged Hornet                     European Hornet

      1       Legs                                      Yellow                                               Dark

      2       Abdomen               Dark, velvety & 1 stripe                        Mainly Yellow

      3       Size                                 Smaller 25mm                                Larger 30mm

The YLH also has an orange face but it is black from above, so not a good differentiator.

ACTION

There is some debate about trapping and the action necessary to find nests and destroy them. Since the YLH is a non-native species it is illegal to release once trapped. So, current advice from the national AHAT is to set up bait stations and observe. If the correct bait is used as the YLH shifts from a carbohydrate feed to a protein feed, then the YLH will return, making positive identification more likely.

March:
Set out small dishes of sugary bait where they are easily and regularly observed.

May/June
Change bait to protein. eg bits of fish finger or cat food. To keep birds away chicken wire may be needed.

Communication

During the year we have passed YLH information directly to members and through our web site.

To repeat, if a sighting is suspected, first inform the RBKA AHAT member via jimwynn333@hotmail.com and be able to report it to the national team through one of the methods below:

1 The ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ app, available free for both Apple and Android
2 Via a web form Bit.ly/report_hornet
3 Emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk
4 Phoning your nearest action team member found here bit.ly/AH-action-team

More information here www.ahat.org.uk

RBKA do not recommend that members follow AHs and find nests as there is no insurance cover for this action.

APIARY ACTION

We will be adding YLH observation and control methods and approaches to our education programme so that beginners are able to identify and observe YLHs as well as advice on shields and muzzles for hive protection.

SIGHTINGS

There has been less sighting so far this year, 5, compared to 9 last year. Interestingly most sightings are in September and October each year. This is due to the increase in a nest’s hornet population at that time of year. The fear is that one nest can produce many potential queens that could survive a mild winter and produce and exponential growth in colonies in the new year.

Recent confirmed sightings and announcements – 2019

1. Christchurch, Dorset – confirmed 10 October, nest destroyed
2. Christchurch, Dorset – confirmed 1 October 2019 – nest destroyed
3. Ashford, Kent – confirmed 9 September 2019 – single hornet captured
4. Tamworth area, Staffordshire – confirmed 2 September 2019 – nest destroyed
5. New Milton, Hampshire – confirmed 3 July 2019 – single hornet captured

Confirmed sightings in 2018

1. Dungeness, Kent – confirmed 15 October 2018 – single hornet captured
2. Guildford, Surrey – confirmed 28 September 2018 – single dead hornet
3. Brockenhurst, Hampshire – confirmed 26 September 2018 – nest destroyed
4. New Alresford, Hampshire – confirmed 24 September 2018 – nest destroyed
5. Fowey, Cornwall – confirmed 20 September 2018 – nest destroyed
6. Hull, Yorkshire – confirmed 9 September 2018 – single dead hornet
7. Liskeard, Cornwall – confirmed 7 September 2018 – single dead hornet
8. Fowey, Cornwall – confirmed 3 September 2018 – nest destroyed
9. Bury, Lancashire – confirmed 13 April 2018 – single hornet sighted with photograph

Bee Craft Hangouts – Asian Hornet Special 2019

hangouts+logoBee Craft hold informal live webinars to discuss aspects of beekeeping – to which you can submit your questions for the ‘Hangout’ team to answer live on air.

Whether you participate directly or simply observe the discussions, the Hangouts will inevitably provide another great source of ideas, suggestions, views or opinions about may aspects of beekeeping.

Click to CATCH-UP NOW with the Hangout held on 2nd October 

Bee Craft Live: Asian Hornet Special 2019

Look out for details of the next Topics & Dates click here  You can submit questions prior to the show via the link below, or you can send it during and the panel will do their best to answer. [Read more…]

Asian Hornet Week Sept 9th -15th

BBKA Asian Hornet Week

If possible please try to spend an hour a day observing your colonies during Asian Hornet Week. September is the month which sees the maximum number of Asian Hornets so if we have any in our area now is the time to be looking.

If possible take a picture and report the sighting using one of the links here Bit.ly/report_hornetJim Wynn AHAT

At our first 2019/20 Winter Meeting at Woodhatch on Wednesday 4th September, Jim talked us through what we as Beekeepers need to be doing to look out for and react to sightings of the AH’s … and to be prepared to help verify reports from the public of sightings.

The complete presentation is provided here.

Click this link Asian Hornet Presentation JW Sept 2019  or the image below to open the presentation as a pdf file.

 

 

 

Asian Hornet – Update Presentation from Jim Wynn

At the Wednesday 24th July Henfold meeting, Jim Wynn our AHAT leader, presented an update on the status of • Asian hornet sightings  • Practising tracking flight paths  • Key ID features  • Understanding the life cycle  •  Monitoring traps  •  Potential lmpact  •  (some) Hive protection options.

Click this link asian hornet Presentaion JW 24 7 19  or the image below to view the full presentation, and consider these key Actions.  

              • Learn how to identify
                • Small, 1 yellow band, yellow legs
              • Learn how to report
                • Bit.ly/report_hornet
              • Think about trapping
                • Needs constant monitoring
                • bit.ly/monitoring_trap
              • Learn about feeding
                • BBKA News pages 228 on
              • Think about a shield or a muzzle
                • Can help stop wasps too

 

 

 

Asian Hornet – Identified in South Hampshire

As announced by Celia Perry at our meeting on Wednesday (3rd July), the National Bee Unit has confirmed a sighting of an individual, female Asian hornet in New Milton, Hampshire, after it was reported by a member of the public. Based upon visual examination, the hornet is likely to be a queen.

Monitoring is underway to detect any other Asian hornets in the vicinity and to identify any nests which may be in the vicinity. Local beekeepers are asked to be vigilant.

As Celia commented then, we should all be vigilant as well. 

This is the first confirmed sighting since October 2018, when a sighting of an individual hornet was confirmed in Dungeness, Kent.

Nicola Spence, Defra Deputy Director for Plant and Bee Health, said:

By ensuring we are alerted to possible sightings as early as possible, we can take swift and effective action to stamp out the threat posed by Asian hornets. That’s why we are working at speed to locate and investigate any nests in the New Milton area following this confirmed sighting.

While the Asian hornet poses no greater risk to human health than a bee, we recognise the damage they can cause to honey bee colonies and other beneficial insects.

Please continue to look out for any Asian hornets and if you think you’ve spotted one, report your sighting through the Asian hornet app or online.

If you suspect you have seen an Asian hornet you can report this using the iPhone and Android app ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ or by using our online report form. Alternatively, you can email alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk. Please include a photograph.

Identification guides and more information are available and if you keep bees you should keep up to date with the latest situation and advice on our GOV.UK rolling news story.

Asian Hornet Action Team – AHAT

RBKA’s new AHAT Leader is Jim Wynn … and he has a few very important items of information for you.

ALL members should be aware of the …

 

National AHAT website: https://ahat.org.uk

In particular, for guidance about …

Monitoring, go to:  https://ahat.org.uk/monitor-dont-kill/

Observing, go to:  https://ahat.org.uk/monitor-dont-kill/trapping/

It is also recommended that you download the Asian Hornet Watch app to your smart phone.

Register with iRecord via the app and use it to register sitings of AH.

Would YOU be able to be a member of our AHAT?

Respond to reported sitings of an AH on our patch by helping to validate such sitings and assist the NBU in further actions they may take to locate nest sites.

Contact Jim to offer, or for more info.

ALL members should be aware of the AH life cycle…

BBKA Asian Hornet Newsletter No.1

BBKA AH imageTo: All Area Association Secretaries & AHAT Co-Ordinators
From: Anne Rowberry, Trustee and Vice-Chair
Date: 13 February 2019
Reference: Asian Hornet Newsletter no. 1

A WAKEUP CALL – ARE YOU READY?

I have just read an article on DVAV (Dorsal-Ventral Abdominal Vibrations) and I think we as Beekeepers need to take on the message – ‘work is on the horizon’. Not the Spring Inspections or frantic frame making or even booking tickets for the Spring Convention, but we need to be busy. Now is the time to take an extra stroll around woodlands before they come into leaf to check no uninvited guests have been building nests. There won’t be any Asian Hornets in the nests but it may indicate that there could be overwintering queens about to emerge in the area.

Hopefully your area Association has established an Asian Hornet team with each branch or club in the Association having their own team.   

Geoff Blay is Reigate’s AHAT coordinator and would welcome volunteers to form the basis of our own team of responders to reports of Asian Hornets. Go To Post

It is really important that each member of the team is aware of the main identification points of the Hornet and has an information card to refer to if needed (these can be obtained from the NBU or downloaded from their website). Every beekeeper team member needs to be sure about the identifying features of the Asian Hornet (the Yellow Legged Hornet) . We need beekeepers confident about; what it looks like, able to refer sightings to NNSS and where possible video, photograph or preserve the specimen. [Read more…]

Jersey vs Vespa velutina – a talk by Bob Hogge, The Accidental Expert, 19th March ….. Register Now!

Reserve YOUR place NOW.

This talk by Bob Hogge is also open to members of other Surrey Divisions; subject to the number that can be seated in the pavilion. Be sure of securing YOUR place by registering with Geoff Blay now.

Being the developer of the ‘Jersey Method’, Bob Hogge has a lot to answer for. His talk will look at how it is that being inquisitive and “bloody minded,” has given him the opportunity to get up close and personal with Europe’s latest serious threat to pollinators, AS IF THEY NEEDED ANYMORE.

Having kept live nests in his living room and been involved with all the nests dissected in Jersey, he hopes he can encourage others to study this fearsome insect, Although, he would be the first to say they are not quite as fearsome as they are made out to be.
As a beekeeper he will, of course, offer his opinion and recommends that everyone that comes brings a pinch of salt.

Slowing the tide: Jersey vs Vespa velutina

Bob will look at the progression of Vespa velutina nigrithorax and Jersey’s attempts to slow its progress, the methods used and what’s involved in organising against this serious predator of honey bees and other pollinators.
As author of the ‘Jersey Method‘ that has been adopted by many AHATs (Asian Hornet Action Teams) in the UK as their m.o. Bob will describe the method and the improvements added in 2018. [Read more…]

Asian Hornet – What WE Need to be Doing NOW

The last few weeks of September were arguably the most important weeks in the year to be looking out for Asian Hornets … wherever you are in the UK.

Typically 60 or more new queens will have been reared within any established nests and then hatch within weeks to disperse, mate and then lie low until spring next year.  Finding and having a nest destroyed NOW will prevent the massive proliferation of colonies from at least that nest.

  • Know what you are looking out for …

    • CLICK images below to view and/or download a 2 page NBU Alert Notice & Identification aid.

[Read more…]